Kevin Kinman scores 1000th point of his high school career

Photo by Gary DeVon	Kevin Kinman credits his teammates with much of success on the basketball court. He’s been playing ball with many of them since the third grade.

Photo by Gary DeVon Kevin Kinman credits his teammates with much of success on the basketball court. He’s been playing ball with many of them since the third grade.

OROVILLE – They might just have to start calling Zac Kinman the “K” man — “K” as in one-thousand — one-thousand points scored over a standout high school career playing basketball for the Oroville Hornets.

The six-foot one senior said that although he knew he was close because his coach, Carl Iverson, was keeping track, he didn’t know that his 1000th point would come during the Hornet’s 104 to 43 victory over Republic. After the magic basket went through the hoop the feat was made public by the announcer at the game. The news drew applause from both Oroville and Republic fans, according to Kinman.

“It feels pretty good,” said Kinman, who has four more games under his belt since that 29-point night. “I really wasn’t keeping track, I just knew that coach was kinda. I knew I had to score 14 to make 1000.”

When word came over the loudspeaker about his accomplishment and fans from both teams started to applaud, Kinman says it was both “embarrassing and flattering.”

For his efforts he was awarded a team ball that he used his freshman year and the ball will reside in the trophy case at the high school.

“Scoring 1000 is tough to do,” said Coach Iverson about his player’s success. “To score that many points you have to have three great years or score a lot as a freshman.”

Iverson went on to say, “There’s one thing I can say about Zac, he makes the other players look better… he’s not a selfish player.”

Kinman credits those very same teammates with much of his successes.

“Most of us have played basketball together since the third-grade,” said Kinman, rattling off the names of teammates like Jake Thornton, Zeb Guenther, Cody Mills, Luke Rowton, Chris Wolley and Marcus Kinman.

“I think it is a big testament to the team we play well together and we all work hard to accomplish our goals,” Kinman said. “It’s great getting 1000 points, but it’s the state play I’m looking forward to.”

He says his parents’ and his teammate’s parents’ involvement in organizing and instilling in them a love of the game at an early age also deserves credit for what they’ve been able to accomplish. He said he’s had good coaches helping him to hone his skills, as well.

Kinman was also honored last Saturday night with the “Student of the Year” award which he received at the annual Oroville Chamber of Commerce banquet.

“A couple of California colleges have been looking at him,” said a proud Kevin Kinman, who was on hand to see his son get the award at the banquet.

The young ballplayer says he is not sure where he will end up, although wherever it is he says he plans on playing basketball. Kinman, who also served as Oroville’s quarterback, said his post high school plans don’t include the gridiron.

“I like football, but basketball’s my first love,” he said.

About Gary DeVon

Gary DeVon is the managing editor of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and celebrated his 25th year at the newspaper in August 2012. He graduated from Gonzaga University with a degree in Communications - Print Journalism, with an emphasis in photojournalism. He is a proud alumnus of Oroville High School. His family first settled in Okanogan County in the late 1800s. His parents are the Judy DeVon and the late Larry DeVon and he has two younger brothers - Dante and Michael. Many family members still call Oroville home. He is single with a grown daughter, Segornae Douglas and a young granddaughter, Erin.

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