Campfires banned on DNR-protected lands across Eastern Washington

OLYMPIA – As of Friday, Aug. 17, campfires are banned on all lands protected from wildfire by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) east of the Cascades. This ban joins many other jurisdictions that have also prohibited campfires.

“We’ve had 47 wildfires started by campfires this year,” said Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz. “With nine active large wildfires in eastern Washington and a long season still ahead of us, it’s imperative that we’re doing all we can to minimize additional risk.”

Some western Washington campgrounds still allow campfires, but only in approved fire pits within state, county, municipal or private campgrounds. Always check with local authorities before lighting any fire.

To date, DNR has responded to more than 1,050 wildfires, which have burned more than 280,000 acres. Currently, 3,688 state, federal, and local firefighters are deployed in Washington.

Statewide, the fire danger remains high or extreme with temperatures forecasted to rise later this week. Daily updates on DNR burn restrictions are available at 1-800-323-BURN or on the Fire Danger and Outdoor Burning risk map at www.dnr.wa.gov/burn-restrictions.

Stay connected during wildfire season

Anyone who spots a wildfire should call 911 as soon as possible to report it.

DNR’s wildfire mission

Led by Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz, DNR is responsible for preventing and fighting wildfires on 13 million acres of private, state and tribal-owned land. DNR is the state’s largest wildfire fighting force.

About Gary DeVon

Gary DeVon is the managing editor of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune and celebrated his 25th year at the newspaper in August 2012. He graduated from Gonzaga University with a degree in Communications - Print Journalism, with an emphasis in photojournalism. He is a proud alumnus of Oroville High School. His family first settled in Okanogan County in the late 1800s. His parents are Judy DeVon and the late Larry DeVon and he has two younger brothers - Dante and Michael. Many family members still call Oroville home. He has a grown daughter, Segornae Douglas and a young granddaughter, Erin.