Oroville graduate Laura James wins her second Emmy

Seattle-based videographer wins award for work on “Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish”

Seattle-based videographer  Laura James, a 1990  Oroville High School Graduate, with her second Emmy. She won for her camera work on the KXTS9 production of “Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish. Submitted photo
Seattle-based videographer Laura James, a 1990 Oroville High School Graduate, with her second Emmy. She won for her camera work on the KXTS9 production of “Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish. Submitted photo

SEATTLE – Videographer Laura James, a 1900 graduate of Oroville High School, recently won her second television Emmy® Award in Environmental Feature/Segment in the Northwest Region of the U.S. for her underwater video work on Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish.

The program appeared was produced by KCTS9’s Katie Campbell and edited by Michael Werner. James, a Seattle-based videographer was presented with the Emmy on June 6. She won her first Emmy in 2014 in the Health/Science Feature/Segment category in the Northwest Region for Sea Otters vs. Climate Change produced by Michael Werner for Quest PBS.

“The Emmy Awards in the Northwest Region are a favorite. It’s wonderful to see the team recognized for their continued excellence in the field of environmental reporting,” said James.

“This was my third year attending and second year taking home an award for my contribution to a great story. The starfish story is special to me because I was directly involved in the event; documenting and helping build a citizen science reporting website related to the crisis. It really felt personal. This Emmy feels very well earned as we were up against several other brilliant stories in this tough category.”

James has been contributing to local media stories for the past decade and sharing the underwater world with divers and non-divers alike. She is the director of www.tox-ick.org, a grass roots storm water education program dedicated to helping reduce the flow of polluted runoff into Puget Sound.

She has spent the past two years building Beneath the Looking Glass’ project “Know What’s Below,” a curriculum extension. “Know What’s Below” has been developed from the ground up with the mission of inspiring, connecting, preserving and protecting the underwater world. She uses multi-media, narrated video shorts, OpenROV builds with students, and presenting about the amazing marine ecosystem around the Pacific Northwest to deliver the program.www.btlgproject.com.

Laura-James-Camera-24
Laura James with the tools of her trade.

KCTS 9 first went on the air on Dec. 7, 1954 broadcasting from the campus of the University of Washington using equipment donated by KING-TV owner Dorothy Bullitt. In 1970, National Educational Television was absorbed into the newly created Public Broadcasting Service. KCTS 9 is seen throughout southwestern British Columbia on local cable systems, across Canada on the Bell TV, Shaw Direct satellite providers, as well as, on many other Canadian cable TV systems.

Laura-James-Starfish-24The Emmy® Awards of the Northwest Region highlights each year’s regional activities with an award ceremony in June. Along with the Emmy® Awards, the chapter provides the region’s professionals with seminars, programs, and networking. The Northwest Chapter of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences serves television and media professionals in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Washington.

About her time in Oroville, James said, “I started attending Oroville Elementary school in third Grade, Miss Villiars class. My favorite teachers were George Thornton, he always encouraged my curiosity; Lee Root, who made sure I knew how to compose and be literate and Coach ‘Chuck’ Ricevuto. who’s business education class is still hands down the most useful class I’ve ever taken, at any level of education. I use what I learned from him on a daily basis.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Stories