Sylvia Gay Brazle

Sylvia Gay Brazle entered eternal life on Friday, Feb. 15, 2008 at home on the ranch.

Gay was born on March 3, 1935 in Midway, Arkansas to parents O.M. and Bess Miller. Gay grew up in Arkansas and graduated from Paris High School. She came to Oroville in the early 1950′s working at Palmer-Nelson Hardware. On Nov. 19, 1954 she married Dean Brazle in Oroville. Gay worked in the local apple warehouses and also, along with her husband, owned grocery stores in the Loomis and Oroville area.

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David Leo Peterson

David Leo Peterson was born in Tonasket, the known center of the universe, on Dec. 31, 1944 to Joy and Leo Peterson, loving parents who gave him a safe early life.

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Developer wants to build eleven $1 million lakefront homes

OROVILLE – Yet another request to be annexed into the city was heard by the Oroville Council at their Tuesday, Feb. 4 meeting.

While the council considered a previous request to grow its boundaries between Lake Osoyoos and the Chesaw and Eastlake Roads, a new proposal asking the city to take in land on the west side of the road was heard.

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The sign for the new Oroville Building Supply, across from its old location south of Oroville on Highway 97, recently went up. The business, comprised of a new, larger storefront and separate building to store wood and other building materials, is nearing

Taxable sales rise in Oroville, Omak, Brewster, Chelan and Leavenworth

While some areas of the nation are experiencing an economic slowdown, that doesn’t appear to be the case for most cities and counties in North Central Washington, according to a series of reports released this month by the Washington Department of Revenue.

Among area communities, taxable retail sales increased from $8.6 million to nearly $11 million for a 27.9 percent increase in Brewster; from $1.26 million to $1.36 million for a 7.9 percent increase in Bridgeport; from $48.6 million to $49.5 million for a 1.8 percent increase in Chelan; from $1.53 million to $2.7 million for a whopping 77.6 percent increase in Entiat; from $31 million to $34.2 million for a 10.2 percent increase in Leavenworth; from $13 million to nearly $16 million for a 22.4 percent increase in Okanogan; from $37.3 million to $48.9 million for a 31.1 percent increase in Omak; and from $7.4 million to $9 million for a 22.8 percent increase in Oroville, according to figures for the third quarter of 2007 reported by the WDR.

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Bear Cub Josh Crazy receives badges from Kelvin Davis during the awards ceremony Jan. 6.

Tonasket Cub Scouts celebrate 80 years of scouting with Blue and Gold Banqu

TONASKET – Webelos, Bears and Wolf Cubs – oh my! Add in a few Tiger Cubs and the ingredients are right for the 2008 Tonasket Cub Scout’s Blue and Gold Banquet Feb. 6.

Family, friends and leaders turned out to watch 17 Cub Scouts put on performances, receive awards and celebrate the experience’s they’ve had in scouting.

The Blue and Gold Banquet celebrates the anniversary of Cub Scouting, begun in the United States in 1930.

Several of the boys received their first-ever badge, the Bobcat Badge.

Cub Scouts honored that night were: Tiger Cubs Mitchell Fitzthum, Christopher Goddard and Evan Grant; Wolf Cubs Austin Engbaum, Austin Glenn, Michael Gonzalez, Isaac Mills, Riley Morris, Mason Rawley, Joseph Schell, Samuel Strandberg and Dominique Wilcox; Bear Cubs Josh Cravy, Hunter Swanson and Benjamin Mills; and Webelos Blake Ash, Christian Carpenter and David Moreno.

Kelvin Davis and Jean Cravy shared emcee duties for most of the evening. The Wolf Cubs presented the flag. Emmit and Wayne Verbeck attended on behalf of the Tonasket Kiwanis Club.

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Donations to YAC most appreciated

The Youth Activity Center (YAC) on Central in Oroville has been in operation for five years, opening our doors Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. as a drop-in center for all age kids to have a place to hang out and build relationships with adults who take the time to be there for them. Monday nights are specifically a time for junior and senior high students. With a fantastic staff of volunteers we have been able to minister to upwards of 30 to 40 kids.

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Our kids need your support for levy

Another Tonasket school levy coming up! This community has been great in their support for our school and they need you again to keep our school top notch! Our kids are our future.

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Let-it-burn ‘green’ policy the wrong color

Bill Forhan’s commentary, ‘Green Policy’s Legacy of Waste’ triggered thoughts of old when we used to frown on shortcuts; when a “let it burn” policy was never in play.

My thoughts meandered to remember how this little tot of eight or ten years of age would be in awe watching what then seemed a mile long bright gleaming red fire engine (truck). Men seemed to claw to it hanging on all sides, their heads all facing in one direction, forward; all cloaked in black rain resistant gear. The large coils of hose looked like the huge reptiles I used to see in the reptile house at the Bronx Zoo.

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Eagles not the one that quit negotiations with hospital

We keep hearing and seeing article in the newspapers stating the Tonasket Eagles quit negotiating with the North Valley Hospital on the purchase of the Eagles building and property and that we offered to sell 18 feet north of our building and 10 feet east of our building that is adjacent to the alley to the hospital. That is not true.

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School boards deserve credit for keeping levy rate down

Voters within the Oroville and Tonasket School Districts will be asked to approve new two-year maintenance and operations levies to replace the ones that run out at the end of this school year. In fact, all the school districts in Okanogan County will be asking voters to support their schools because state basic education funds fall short of what is really needed to educate our children – our citizens of tomorrow.

In a perfect world Washington State would actually provide a public education that did not need to be subsidized with levies. However, it is not a perfect world and we still want our children, these future leaders, to have the tools they need to be good citizens of our country.

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Be afraid, be very afraid

The Washington State Legislature is in session and looking at the list of proposed bills; nobody’s wallet is safe. Following their last session where the Democrat controlled legislature threw bipartisanship out the window and set new records for spending, it looks like they have set a course to follow that up with new tax programs that will dwarf any in recent memory.

Thanks to Proposition 960 the Office of Management and Budget must calculate the cost of bills submitted for consideration. This newspaper has signed on to receive email notification of those budget calculations and each day we receive numerous messages about the cost to taxpayers of new legislation. While many of the proposals are specific to individual segments of our state economy, there are currently two bills in the legislative process that would add over $88 billion in new taxes over the next 10 years. Yes, that is billion with a B. To put that in perspective those two bills would cost every occupied household in Washington state approximately $37,500 over the next 10 years. That is an average of just over $4,550 per year or 8.7 percent of the average household income in this state.

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