‘Marshal Middleton’ finally gets to ride the parade

Longtime Tonasket School District music teacher Patti Middleton will serve as the 2013 Tonasket Founders Day Parade Grand Marshal. Brent Baker/staff photo

Longtime Tonasket School District music teacher Patti Middleton will serve as the 2013 Tonasket Founders Day Parade Grand Marshal. Brent Baker/staff photo

TONASKET – Patti Middleton is no stranger to parades.

But she’s never gotten to ride in one. As the longtime music teacher in the Tonasket School District, she’s marched in countless parades, including many editions of the Founders Day variety, always as part of the Tonasket Marching Band.

“I’ve never ridden in a parade,” Middleton said. “I’ve walked a lot of miles in them with the band, but never got to ride in one.”

Middleton, her husband Randy and five grandchildren (all under the age of five) will ensconce themselves in a sheep wagon provided by her brother, Mike Buchert, as she rides the parade as this year’s Tonasket Founders Day Parade Grand Marshal.

As usually happens with the grand marshal, Middleton was shocked to hear her name called at the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce’s annual banquet in February.

“My first hint was when (Tonasket Mayor) Pat (Plumb) said something about rhythm,” she said. “I was like, ‘What the heck is he talking about?’

“But that was fun because he was one of my students.”

And there are a lot of her former students in the Tonasket area. Middleton retired from a long stint as the school’s music teacher last year. And unlike most classroom teachers, she had a lot of those students for many years, giving her a chance to see a lot of them grow up.

“The best part of teaching was the kids I got to know,” she said. “A lot of them are friends now that they’re adults.

“That’s wonderful, and one of the great things about teaching, and especially about music because you get them year after year.”

Middleton, born and raised in Tonasket, was deeply influenced by former music teacher Wally Moore.

“He had such a big impact on me and many, many other students,” she said. “The things that Wally believed in – like work ethic, always doing your best and trying your hardest – I hope, as far as musicality, that I taught that.

“What was really fun was giving the kids an opportunity to showcase themselves. They really do rise to the occasion in music, athletics or anything else. They really want that.”

Since retiring she’s been busy running her business, Buena Vista Quilting and Lodging, and working with Randy with their other business, AdvoCare.

“I spend a lot more time at church, and I don’t feel like I’m rushed and tired,” she said. “The best part is not having any bells going off (as at school).

“I miss the instructional part, and being a part of the band. But you do move onto other things.”

Middleton said she had plenty of happy memories from her teaching years.

“I absolutely feel blessed,” she said. “Tonasket has many, many wonderful people who live here. I always felt like the community was very supportive of the music department and people always appreciated what the kids did.

“It was the hometown band, hometown choir, and a lot of people came to the concerts. It made the kids feel wonderful.”

About Brent Baker

Brent is a reporter for the Gazette-Tribune. Prior to working at the G-T, he was the sports editor for Sunrise Publishing from 2000-2005 in Michigan. He subsequently owned and operated Buckland Media, a high school sports website, in Michigan until 2010. He and his wife Kim, who have an adult son, moved to Tonasket in 2010. Brent started work at the G-T in 2011.

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Commenting Rules

We encourage an open exchange of ideas in our online community, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. In a nutshell, don't say anything you wouldn't want your mother to read. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

So keep your comments civil, smart, on-topic and free of profanity.

We ask that all participants own their words by logging in with their Facebook account. It's a simple process that will take seconds and helps keep our comments free of trolls, cranks, and "drive-by" commenters. We reserve the right to remove comments from anyone using screen names, pseudonyms or false identities. Please refer to our Terms of Use for full detail on participating on our site.
No comments yet.

Leave a Reply